12 months of 2021: January

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It was another year of turbulence for people professionals. Our 12 Days of Christmas countdown reviews what made the headlines in 2021.

Employers failing to tackle age bias in recruitment

Centre for Ageing Better research found employers and recruiters were frequently overlooking talents of over-50s workers.

The most common response from employers regarding older workers was that they ‘have poor IT skills’ or look ‘worn-out.’

The research also found very little evidence that employers evaluate the effectiveness of initiatives that are meant to reduce discrimination more generally.

 

Working parents lying over homeschooling

A lack of flexible working options forced many employees to lie to their bosses during lockdown.

One in three (33%) working parents have admitted to bending the truth around home-schooling according to a new poll by HR payroll advisor MHR International.

It found that working parents have been reluctant to tell the truth about how they are coping with the balance between homeschooling and work.

 

Fire and rehire tactics surge during COVID-19 

Fire and rehire tactics became more widespread during the height of the COVID-19 pandemic, the Trade Union Congress (TUC) has warned.

Its poll found that since the first national lockdown in March 2020, nearly one in ten (9%) workers have been told to reapply for their jobs on worse terms and conditions, or else they’d be let go.

HR teams need to be wary of the tactic, as it could lead to employment tribunals and workers' strikes.

The TUC said that the situation is worse for BME and young workers, as well as those from working class backgrounds.

Nearly a fifth of (18%) of 18-to-24-year-olds said that their employer has tried to rehire them on inferior terms during the pandemic.

 

The best bits of HR magazine from December 2020:

CIPD Scotland calls for new initiatives to tackle nation’s long-term skills challenges

Glassdoor announces Great Places to Work 2021 list

Morrisons the first UK supermarket to pay minimum £10 an hour