Lynda Gratton

We must widen our vision of what could shape the future of work

The future of work is a story we will be narrating for many more decades to come

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Lynda Gratton: Adult-adult work relationships in multi-stage lives

The relationship between employer and employee is moving from ‘parent-child’ to ‘adult-adult’

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Lynda Gratton: The HR implications of longevity

The three-stage life of full-time education, full-time work, and full-time retirement will rapidly be replaced

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Lynda Gratton: Why the future of work is so fascinating

We are always confronted with new ideas and emerging topics

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Recognising the value of intangible assets

Is money really the most important thing an employer can offer?

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HR must prepare employees for disruptive technologies

We are looking at a fundamental shift in the way we think about the relationship between technology and work

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Gratton: Why is complex collaboration so tough?

Organisational charts often mask informal networks that cross functions. We must understand these relationships

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Lynda Gratton: Companies must interact with communities to build resilience

In order to be resilient to change, companies must innovate and interact with their employees. They cannot ignore the social wealth and knowledge that staff bring to the workplace.

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Lynda Gratton: Companies must ditch outdated methods to jam with global workforce

If globalisation has changed the way we work, it is also changing people’s attitudes to work, asks Lynda Gratton, professor of management practice at London Business School.

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Three shifts into the future: old assumptions of job and career will be destroyed

There are forces at work that over the coming decades will destroy forever many of the old assumptions of a traditional job and career, says Lynda Gratton (pictured).

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Book Review - The Why of Work: How Great Leaders Build Organisations That Win, by Dave Ulrich, Wendy Ulrich and Marshall Goldsmith

Anyone wanting a deeper understanding of what Dave Ulrich believes will find it in this book, says Lynda Gratton. It is a combination of research, self-reflection and a host of personal and family...

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