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CIPD: Poor careers advice is leading to "skills mismatch"

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Government, schools and employers need to work together to help young people into work as poor careers advice is leading to a "skills mismatch", according to research published today by the Chartered Institute for Personnel and Development (CIPD).

The research is part of the CIPD's Learning to work campaign, which highlights that the careers advice currently provided in schools is too generalised and is not doing enough to prepare people for the jobs market, creating skills mismatches.

It found more than half (53%) of employers believe that young people receive inadequate careers advice and almost two thirds (63%) said that the young people they had recruited lacked insight into the working world.

The research has stated there is an alarming lack of knowledge among young people about the different job sectors and occupations. It claims a consequence of this is not enough of them are studying the subjects required for certain jobs and once entering the labour market many young people are ruling out whole sectors as potential employers as they don't have enough information about what opportunities are available.

The research states one solution is to enhance the links between education providers and businesses to ensure that pupils have the opportunity to hear directly from employers about different career paths.

Peter Cheese, chief executive of the CIPD said: "There has never been a golden age of careers advice in schools and unfortunately it has failed to develop in response to the increasing complexities of the labour market, causing problems for both young people and employers.

"There is an already a worrying mismatch between the skills employers need and the skills the next generation of workers are focusing on."

Cheese added: "A critical way to help resolve this is to increase the emphasis on careers advice in schools and to get employers into schools more regularly, bringing to life the natures of different careers, and the generic and specific skills they're looking for when they recruit."

In November 2012 HR magazine hosted a live web TV debate on the skills gap in the UK. If you missed it you can now still register for free and watch it back on-demand.

The debate brought together experts to discuss practical steps to transform the skills and productivity of the UK's workforce.

You will also still be able to take part in the debate through our interactive technology with onscreen research providing statistical data, feedback and insight.

The debate featured views from:

Mike Williams, director of people development at DeVere Hotels and Village Urban Resorts, on how the 6,000-employee group approaches skills development.

Paul Sissons, senior researcher at the Work Foundation, on the scale of the problem and what employers need to do to address it.

Dereth Wood, director of operations at learndirect, on achieving cost-effective results through agility and flexibility in skills training.

To register and watch the debate click here