About

THE HR BRAND

Below you can find out information about HR magazine's audience, postioning and values as well as our editorial policy for PRs/advertisers and for journalists.

PLEASE READ THESE before contacting the editorial staff to ensure time is not wasted on both sides.

CORE TARGET AUDIENCE INSIGHT

For people-focused, forward-thinking, business leaders who want insight into and examples of business-contextualised HR in order to develop high-performing organisations.

HR magazine is individually requested and independently audited (ABC). Its ABC circulation is 8,026 and comprises HR directors/heads of HR, chief executives, managing directors, finance directors and chairman positions only. According to the British Business Survey 2011, conducted by Ipsos Mori which surveys 1.8 million purchase decision makers, 75,000 purchase decision makers had interacted with the HR brand in the previous four weeks. 

HR's daily builletin goes to 16,000 registered users.

POSITIONING

HR is the single most stimulating source of strategic, people-centric, business advice, practice and dialogue.

VALUES

  • Aspirational – we want to improve the standing of our readers and provide a career route map for HR professionals
  • Accessible – Our content is easy to read, of relevance and interest to both HR and non-HR professionals, and our team works hard at being at the heart of the community
  • Connecting – Whether in print, online or face-to-face, we are the hub through which the community can connect with each other
  • Opinionated – We have a view, and we’re clear when we say things could be done better or differently

PERSONALITY

  • Our attitude is...unstuffy. We’re punchy, and avoid being dry, ivory-tower and elitist
  • Our tone of voice is...confident. We’re sure of our place, and we don’t feel the need to talk up to senior readers or down to others
  • Our look is...upmarket and business-like. We look as good as an aspirational consumer magazine, but we never forget we’re a business brand
  • Our feel is..rewarding. Readers get a visual treat and value from the content
  • Our depth of read is...We’re an appointment read, worth making the time for

EDITORIAL PROMISES

  • Always put HR into a business perspective
  • Always tell the audience what they need to know, not what they expect to hear
  • Always give access to leaders and to leading thinking
  • Always have our own voice
  • Always provide the audience with something new

OUR PEOPLE

HR’s people will always be

  • Empathetic
  • Engaged
  • Prepared to take responsibility
  • Curious, knowing what questions to ask and when
  • Helpful and flexible
  • Best in sector

OVER-ARCHING BRAND PROMISE

HR will always seek give meaningful, relevant and useful business focus to its content.

 

POLICIES AND PRACTICES

HR magazine editorial policy (for PRs and advertisers)

Article contribution: HR magazine does not take unsolicited articles. The editorial team commissions all opinion pieces and features. If you have an idea, please contact a member of the team (see Submission of ideas).

Commercial partners: HR magazine works closely with commercial partners in order to explore subjects and issues more deeply than the pages of the publication allow. These partnerships could include sponsored research, networks, online debates, events and supplements. In all these relationships editorial integrity and transparency are foremost and it will be made clear that the funding has come from these partners. Ahead of such projects a team comprising the editor or deputy editor (or designated editorial member), an HR magazine sales person and representation from the sponsor will meet to discuss the proposal and ensure there is complete clarity and understanding of the expectations of both sides. The editorial team will be responsible for producing accurate, stimulating and credible information and will have sole decision making as to the content. However, the editorial team will include the sponsor in ideas and will listen to suggested angles.

Confidentiality: If an organisation/person would like a confidential/off-the-record briefing, it must be made clear prior to the meeting/discussion.

Copy approval: The policy of the publication is that no one has the right to editorial copy approval. If a journalist is unsure of factual information, he or she can check these with the interviewee (for example, financial figures/specific names) via phone/email but must not submit the full copy. If an interviewee requests copy approval prior to the interview they should be told our policy and the interview conducted under these circumstances. If they are uncomfortable with our policy, the interview should be terminated.

In the case of commissioned opinion pieces, HR magazine has the right to edit for style, appropriateness and fit. There is no requirement on HR magazine's behalf to alter copy or show it in advance of going to press.

Copyright: Copyright law protects against unauthorised use and provides a business framework for dealing in intellectual property. Using material without prior consent exposes you to legal action from the rights holder. A breach of copyright can lead to severe financial penalties and in some cases criminal liability, no matter how innocuous the use may seem.

Whether you wish to reproduce content for commercial purposes or personal use the same rules apply. All HR magazine content is copyright. To request a PDF or right to reprint/use an article electronically, please contact Licensing (01722 717044)

Deadlines: The magazine has a series of deadlines, depending on whether the story is news or features-led. Features-list features are commissioned two months in advance, with the journalist's deadline a month before the issue in which it is due to appear. In other words, a journalist will be commissioned early August for October.

 

HR FEATURES LIST

HR magazine carries run of paper features, issue and trend-led analyses and supplements. In a bid to ensure our features are timely - and as they regularly change -  we have opted not to publish an advanced features list. 

Features are commissioned out at least two months in advance and journalists submit copy the month prior to publication. Press day is typically around 20th of the month. Please contact Paul Barron for advertising enquiries on 020 7501 6706 and email katie.jacobs@markallengroup.com, for questions regarding editorial. If you want a features synposis please email Paul Barron on paul.barron@markallengroup.com

Features for hrmagazine.co.uk are commissioned on a daily basis. To pitch an idea contact katie.jacobs@markallengroup.com

 

Paid-for articles: HR magazine does not take paid-for articles other than advertorials. Advertorials must be clearly labeled and adhere to our advertorial guidelines (contact Paul Barron on 020 7501 6706 for more information).

Press releases: HR magazine journalists receive hundreds of press releases/emails every day. If your story is of interest we will contact you. Please do not call to chase.

Submission of ideas: We welcome genuinely relevant, strategic and timely ideas. Please do not send a round robin email - if you are approaching another magazine, we will not be interested. For more on our brand, please read our brand definition and behaviour.

Please bear the below in mind if you are interested in submitting an idea/client:-

  • HR magazine is read by HR director level only. Our readership is strategic, business-focused and defined by its ability to add value to the business. Any ideas/content for the publication must be relevant to this.
  • HR magazine is stimulating, challenging and ground-breaking. We are not interested in the 'same old' story. It must be strategic.
  • Hrmagazine.co.uk attracts a wider readership, including aspirational people in the sector, HR generalist managers, HR specialists, global readers, academics and consultants. Online we provide more news-based articles, opinion and comment and expert views.

Voucher issues: Voucher issues are provided at our discretion. To guarantee a copy of a specific issue, please contact Back Copies (01722 717049)

 

HR magazine editorial code (for journalists)

 

These are the rules to which HR magazine and hrmagazine.co.uk journalists and freelance journalists must adhere:-

Commentators: All features must include HR director-level comment and must be business-focused. This is particularly important in features looking at a particular area in which journalists may be speaking to suppliers. It is vital to ensure your copy is independent and not just promotion for a particular supplier/latest fad. It needs to provide stimulating, relevant and thoughtful information that helps HR strategy.

Confidentiality: If a journalist is told something confidentially he or she must not betray that trust. If the story is significant, the journalist should try to get the source to tell them on-the-record. It must be made clear prior to the discussion that it is off-the-record.

Conflicts of interest: If a journalist has a significant connection to a person/organisation or issue, it should be declared before agreeing the commission. If a journalist has worked for or is helping a particular organisation, it will be mentioned in the article.

Copy approval: The policy of the publication is that no one has the right to editorial copy approval. If a journalist is unsure of factual information, he or she can check these with the interviewee (for example, financial figures/specific names) via phone/email but must not submit the full copy. If an interviewee requests copy approval prior to the interview they should be told our policy and the interview conducted under these circumstances. If they are uncomfortable with our policy, the interview should be terminated.

In the case of commissioned opinion pieces, HR magazine has the right to edit for style, appropriateness and fit. There is no requirement on HR magazine's behalf to alter copy or show it in advance of going to press.

Design: HR magazine is visually rewarding. Photographs provided must be good quality and interesting.

Errors: It is the policy of HR magazine to correct significant errors as soon as possible. However, such errors must be business critical or HR magazine's mistake (incorrect spelling of company/name or incorrect job title for example). We will not update information that has been wrongly provided to us if it does not meet the above criteria and will point out that it is not our mistake. We will also not update information online after it has been published unless it meets the above criteria.

Fairness: Journalists must always ensure there is the chance for those subject to criticism or allegations to respond and must try to get both sides of a story.

Language: While much language has lost its ability to offend in this internet age, journalists should avoid using swear words unless they are absolutely necessary.

Legal: Journalists must take their legal responsibility seriously, in particular in relation to libel and contempt. If there is any concern they must consult the editor.

Non-attributed quotations: People sometimes speak more honestly if they are allowed to speak anonymously. Including such quotes can help readers to a better understanding of an issue than relying on corporate, on-the-record quotes. However, it is the responsibility of the journalist to ensure there is no malice behind such quotes and to get a second source to back up the information.

Payment: Only bona fide journalists are paid for their contribution unless in exceptional circumstances authorised by the editor.

 

 

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