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Employee engagement: time to try another tack?

Mark Wayland says:

Want to improve Engagement scores? Start treating people as valued humans. Then treat them as valued employees. Most companies do it the other way around and that's why engagement scores haven't changed.

The rise of the stress industry

Dr Rosemary Anderson says:

I agree with this lady that the term stress is overused. It is now used to describe having a bad day rather than true distress. I also agree that it is often used by an employee as a good excuse to avoid doing what they can't or don’t want to do. I personally try to get these points across when doing manager training as allowing employees to get away with it is a major issue here. Often this is the easy option and gives those who are genuine a “bad name”. Managers also are unsure what to do so they More...

HR magazine launches app

HR Editorial says:

Hi, thanks for your enquiry regarding the app. We are currently looking into our packages and will have an answer on this issue shortly.

HR magazine launches app

Jo Dodds says:

Great development. Is this included with a 'paper' subscription? Not keen to pay for both! Thanks

Zero-hours contracts 'uncivilised' way to treat staff, says Labour MP

Linda Woodings says:

Is it reasonable for night-shift workers to be sent home at 2am in the morning because there is no more work for them? Is it reasonable and fair for people to be asked to travel into work, incurring expense, only to be told when they arrive that there is no work for them and they should go home? Is it reasonable for people to be offered no work for a whole week, but be banned from seeking work elsewjhere under threat of no further work in the future meaning they can't claim job seekers allowance? No - it can't. But More...

Zero-hours contracts 'uncivilised' way to treat staff, says Labour MP

Sam Masters says:

I believe there is a place for zero-hour contracts. Some businesses may abuse this and mistreat staff, where as others use this to help balance their business for when they are busy or quiet. Tom Watson is only looking at this from a corporate perspective and generalising all businesses who use this approach. I work in the Hospitality Industry and there is a need for some businesses to have zero-hour contract employees on hand. There are always busy days and quiet days. A business cannot afford to have staff standing around when it's dead! Many SME's use a balance of More...

Zero-hours contracts 'uncivilised' way to treat staff, says Labour MP

Trisha Goring says:

Isn't it time we realised that employers are not part of social services and employees are not "doing a favour" by accepting a job and turning up for work. Employers do not have bottomless pockets to pay people to sit around doing nothing, but we do need flexibility. I worked under a zero hours contract for years and found it suited my life style perfectly. How could you have flexible contracted hours?

Private companies should help 'failing' job centres, says think tank

inwork says:

Personality tests should be implemented for people working in the job center to make sure they are not of the sadistic personality type. Those type of people don't thrive by helping others, going pleasure watching others suffer and grovel.

Employers failing to sustain change management initiatives, study finds

Rich Seddon says:

I don’t think there has ever been a time when people have not complained about the difficulty in sustaining change initiatives. It’s nothing to do with training. Change is continual. Entropy is the term that physicists use to describe the tendency of the universe to increasing disorder - if you leave it alone it rots, degrades, explodes etc. It’s the same with organisations - it's just the way of things. In order to stay the same you have to continually embrace change, and in order to know how much, you have to be able to tell the difference between abnormalities More...

What keeps Edward Fitzmaurice, CEO of Hastings Direct, up at night

Gary Bottomley says:

I know Fitzmaurice of old, he's a politicin not a manager. He says what he thinks people want to hear.

Zero-hours contracts 'uncivilised' way to treat staff, says Labour MP

Bipin Joshi says:

Dear Sirs I have to disagree with the labour MP that the "0" hour contracts should be banned. They are of a great advantage to employers and employees where there is a need for both to have a temporary arrangement because of the nature of our industry which is in Security. Contracts with clients' can be temporary which could last only a few days but then end up being extended. Some employees on these kind of contracts actually have full time jobs elsewhere and are trying to earn extra money somewhere else. Surely it is better for people to be More...

The rise of the stress industry

Peter Marno says:

There is so much common sense in this article - and well done to an HR professional for putting the employer's case so eloquently! Regrettably employers cannot rely on the services provided by the State for health to be best managed away from the workplace. Employers need to take the initiative in managing health - both good and bad - and have up-to-date policies which both help identify problems at an early stage and deal with them cost-effectively.

Gaenor Bagley appointed people partner at PwC

Brian Goulden says:

I guess we should not be surprised at the immediate move to outsourcing. PwC have always had a focus on "partner value" and any efforts to reduce costs is to be expected. However, apparently moving the outsourcing operation to a country that is somewhat of an "unknown" in the HR business night be seen by PwC people as a disregard for their overall welfare. But, perhaps, I am being pessimistic; I hope so!

Gaenor Bagley appointed people partner at PwC

Gwynedd Owens says:

She talks about the importance of the HR Function and then decides to outsource the HR shared service centre to Romania and then make nearly 100 people redundant.

Cross-generational conflict caused by communication breakdown, says Peer 1 Hosting HRD

Julia Wright says:

The Campaign for Learning is a member of the European wide network for Intergenerational Learning, which is looking at how intergenerational learning approaches can address some of these issues. Our conference in Spain - Intergenerational Learning Cities - will be looking at employment and entrepreneurship as part of a broader programme.

Cross-generational conflict caused by communication breakdown, says Peer 1 Hosting HRD

Julia Wright says:

The Campaign for Learning is a member of the European wide network for Intergenerational Learning, which is looking at how intergenerational learning approaches can address some of these issues. Our conference in Spain - Intergenerational Learning Cities - will be looking at employment and entrepreneurship as part of a broader programme.

Older workers help avoid skills crisis, report finds

Dorothy smith says:

I also agree there needs to be more planning ahead and greater understanding of the work requirements of 40+ population - and I don't mean physical adjustments! Part of the problem may be the number of HR staff under 35 doing the thinking. The focus is on getting talented graduates, not using the existing graduate skills fully. The skills are there, HR isn't looking.

Shares for rights scheme could be forced on unemployed, says HR Legal Service

Tom Toher says:

Weren't retail workers told that they could not be made work on Sundays? I admire your faith in the government of the day but, with Adam Beeston as one of their advisors, why would you not think that this is just a slippery slope just starting?

Pay the main motivator for employees, says Volkswagen HR director

Jeremy Lewis says:

Pay might atract, but it will not retain employees, not on its own, not even as the "main motivator" as claimed. Sure, it might be relatively more important in tough times as people seek higher levels of financial security through their work, but in the long run other motivators are relatively more important. For shopfloor workers it has always been one of the main motivators, along with the social aspects of working with people you like, but for managers and professionals it's recognition, autonomy and self-fulfillment that will ALAWYS win out in the long run. Without offering these you will More...

Skills shortages as young people shun manufacturing

Stephen Melia says:

The Manufacturing Institute runs a schools programme called Make It in Manufacturing. The campaign was established to overturn negative perceptions that some young people hold about careers in the sector and create a pipeline of talent for employers. In the last six years we have engaged with over 60,000 young people and evaluation data shows that a teenager is twice as likely to consider working in the sector after taking part in one of our events. We need more support! Please get involved at www.makeit.org.uk

In this issue: October 2014
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One giant leap: Business, government and education must step up to avoid a skills crisis

 

Icing on the cake: Gregg's talent recipe

 

Behind the story: Rebuilding trust at News UK

 

Beyond appraisals: Fixing performance management

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