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How can organisations improve employee engagement, customer satisfaction and business performance?

David Zinger says:

I enjoyed this short piece on the importance of weaving together employee engagement, customer satisfaction and business performance, thank you.

Labour U-turn over claims against Tesco and Next use of foreign workers

B Tank says:

Shadow immigration minister Chris Bryant is in my opinion is not totally out of the way in saying very many large Companies employee immigrants. It is nit illegal to employ immigrants be they reputable large organizations or medium or small businesses. The problem is there are very many capable, experienced, hard workings both in field of white coloured and blue coloured citizens of the UK are desperately seeking jobs and the UK and the ones should be offered priority for the available job. There are Recruitment Agencies mushrooming in the EU Countries advertising and offering jobs in the UK. This More...

Prince's Trust calls for better vocational support to help struggling school leavers

Keith Appleyard says:

On a similar note : I've just had forwarded to me a P46 completed by a new Employee who will be aged 20 next month. Looks like no-one has ever taught her how to complete a computer input form (with one box per character). Her address, from street name to City inclusive, just runs together without a single space. The Post Code just runs from left to right, without an imbedded space. I hope she's better prepared for work (fortunately she's not in an office environment). Surely the school should have taught her how to complete such forms?

Labour accuses Tesco and Next of favouring cheap migrant workers

GRH says:

without fire. It's quite possible the allegations are true; I can well imagine a senario where plan 'B' kicks in on discovery - shock horror; hands in the air with outrage how can you say that we do this and that and the other; we are reponsible employers...look at out record etc., etc., etc. Then the whole thing could be made up to divert attention away from some other thing that is being slid in under the door. Either way it is business as usual; move along please, nothing to see.

Financial firms forced to set targets for women on boards

Kay White says:

Agree with Michael Moran's comment - it's too important and changing too slowly to be left to 'as and when'. Quotas will bring diversity on Boards sharply into focus and accelerate the 'talking' about it.

Financial firms forced to set targets for women on boards

Michael Moran says:

I regret to say without mandating change it simply won't happen. Progress since the publication of Davies has been painfully slow. This is a step in the right direction.

Temporary jobs driving employment levels, says TUC

Benny Profane says:

The main increases in this population have been in higher and intermediate level occupations. 'Temporary' also includes fixed term contracts which account for 68,000 of the increase since 2005. Casual work has increased by just 8,000, agency working by 17,000 and seasonal work by 13,000. As ever the unions are spinning. http://www.ons.gov.uk/ons/rel/lms/labour-market-statistics/july-2013/table-emp10.xls

Older workers help avoid skills crisis, report finds

Spencer Jacobs says:

Older workers have many years of work and life experience to offer, which can be a bonus to most companies. Forties People have placed 100's of candidates over the years that have been made to retire and who are not ready to give up work, after all we are all living longer. Spencer Jacobs Director Forties People Ltd www.fortiespeople.com

CEO Sodexo UK: Introduce quotas for women on boards

Dr Colin Thompson says:

If woman have the ability and the `right` attitude then they should work to become a Director of a business. The CEO of Sodexo UK is a woman and so are many of the managers. What is Sodexo`s retention of employees? Is it very low?

HR: Tried and tested or something new?

Andy Crichton says:

In our field of endeavour, to me, innovation is as simple as doing what is considered the basics in most sectors. To be viewed as an innovative decorating company: - answer telephone or email enquiries within an hour. - submit a fully itemised quote, with prices broken down, definite start dates and finish dates…and send it out within 24 hours, woah, Flash. Pitiful innovators aren't we! And so it goes on when doing the work. It is innovative to run a clean job site based around dustless sanding equipment. It is innovative to achieve a good finish with water based More...

Charities defend chief executive pay

Keith Appleyard says:

I see the Telegraph today reported that Sir Stephen Bubb, the Chief Executive of the Association of Chief Executives of Voluntary Organisations (ACEVO), who is thought to be paid over £100,000 a year, had his 60th Birthday Party partly funded by ACEVO (although he did buy his own cake) because it was "part of its ongoing work in building stakeholder relationships". Can I make my next birthday party tax-deductible?

Is there a business case for flexible working?

jen says:

Providing the nature of your job allows you to manage your workload in an alternative business work set up, I think this can benefit the employee and employer greatly. Often the employee can feel very concious to perform in their arrangement and as a result can produce highly efficient results attached to workload. It may also allow employees to retain talent in their organisation and also can be cost efficient to business.

Zero-hours legal challenge against Sports Direct 'unlikely to succeed', says employment lawyer

Tom Toher says:

The great defender of zero hours contracts, the REC's Kevin Green, was obviously caught out when confronted by their abuse by Amazon at their Rugeley distribution centre on TV last week. I know that sometimes they mutually suit individuals and employers but they were surely never intended to be used on this scale. They are now being used to further roll back the worst employment protections in Europe and put us all back into a dark age that will breed resentment and bitterness among exploited workers. A recipe for disaster for us all. It turns out even the Guardian Media More...

Charities defend chief executive pay

Mike Godfrey says:

Would it be a good idea if we could see the 'JOB' description for some of these CEO's? What do they actually do to earn these high rates? Is it a sitting behind a rose wood desk job or a roll up your sleeves job in the ware house?

Isn't it time to move on from the debate about whether HR is strategic enough?

M L Purohhit says:

Dear friend, I partially agree to the argument that people are to be pushed out due to economic break down. Remember when you enrolled that employee youwere in need as you were running in trouble that without this employee you were not sure of earning your profits. So he became a profit earner for you. Now when the failure had come to you because of your lack of forethaught you are willing to sack the same employee who was a frofit earner for you during yesterdays. What a contrast in thinking. Remember it is this employee who will bring you More...

Charities defend chief executive pay

roy allen says:

It is disgusting that these executives receive these massive salaries. The hard work is done by the local officials not the top dogs . The people who stand in the rain on street corners asking for coppers from people.who give generously not thinking their hard earned pennies are going into the pockets of these millionaire vultures.

Employee engagement: time to try another tack?

Kevin Ruck says:

One reason why engagement has got stuck is that internal communication is not prioritised as much as it should be. If you asked 150 managers about internal communication, it would get much more attention. And internal communication is an antecedent for engagement. Keep employees informed and give them a say in what goes on and then watch engagement rise! Kevin www.exploringinternalcommunication.com

Zero-hours legal challenge against Sports Direct 'unlikely to succeed', says employment lawyer

Kathryn Dooks says:

Notwithstanding that the part-time discrimination claim is unlikely to succeed, the SportsDirect zero hours staff may still be able to show that they are in fact workers or employees (because they cannot realistically turn down work) and are therefore entitled to holiday pay and statutory sick pay.

One in four mothers feels discriminated against at work

Carol H Scott says:

Hot on the heels of solicitors Slater & Gordon's report in June, here's another report on the same lines not two months later! One muses on how often law firms finance surveys - other than for commercial advantage - and just who would benefit from law suits about maternity rights? Employment lawyers? Now there's a surprise! Latest stats for live births in the UK in 2011 was 723,913 according to the office of National Statistics, so exactly how representative is a poll of 2,000 new mothers? Returning mothers felt that the role they returned to had altered compared to the More...

Zero-hours legal challenge against Sports Direct 'unlikely to succeed', says employment lawyer

Tmccormack says:

I have one of these contracts but am being told I must always be available if called and even denied holidays booked two months in advance due to having to cover shifts. I am paid no retainer and have been left without work on occasion this is surely not anything less than exploitation of a vulnerable employment market?

In this issue: October 2014
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Grow influence: Who has made the HR Most Influential 2014 lists? We reveal all inside

Looking good: Beautiful HR at Estee Lauder

Back to the drawing board: Is HR more art than science?

Forward thinking: Futureproof your technology strategy

 

 

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