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What keeps Edward Fitzmaurice, CEO of Hastings Direct, up at night

Gary Bottomley says:

I know Fitzmaurice of old, he's a politicin not a manager. He says what he thinks people want to hear.

Zero-hours contracts 'uncivilised' way to treat staff, says Labour MP

Bipin Joshi says:

Dear Sirs I have to disagree with the labour MP that the "0" hour contracts should be banned. They are of a great advantage to employers and employees where there is a need for both to have a temporary arrangement because of the nature of our industry which is in Security. Contracts with clients' can be temporary which could last only a few days but then end up being extended. Some employees on these kind of contracts actually have full time jobs elsewhere and are trying to earn extra money somewhere else. Surely it is better for people to be More...

The rise of the stress industry

Peter Marno says:

There is so much common sense in this article - and well done to an HR professional for putting the employer's case so eloquently! Regrettably employers cannot rely on the services provided by the State for health to be best managed away from the workplace. Employers need to take the initiative in managing health - both good and bad - and have up-to-date policies which both help identify problems at an early stage and deal with them cost-effectively.

Gaenor Bagley appointed people partner at PwC

Brian Goulden says:

I guess we should not be surprised at the immediate move to outsourcing. PwC have always had a focus on "partner value" and any efforts to reduce costs is to be expected. However, apparently moving the outsourcing operation to a country that is somewhat of an "unknown" in the HR business night be seen by PwC people as a disregard for their overall welfare. But, perhaps, I am being pessimistic; I hope so!

Gaenor Bagley appointed people partner at PwC

Gwynedd Owens says:

She talks about the importance of the HR Function and then decides to outsource the HR shared service centre to Romania and then make nearly 100 people redundant.

Cross-generational conflict caused by communication breakdown, says Peer 1 Hosting HRD

Julia Wright says:

The Campaign for Learning is a member of the European wide network for Intergenerational Learning, which is looking at how intergenerational learning approaches can address some of these issues. Our conference in Spain - Intergenerational Learning Cities - will be looking at employment and entrepreneurship as part of a broader programme.

Cross-generational conflict caused by communication breakdown, says Peer 1 Hosting HRD

Julia Wright says:

The Campaign for Learning is a member of the European wide network for Intergenerational Learning, which is looking at how intergenerational learning approaches can address some of these issues. Our conference in Spain - Intergenerational Learning Cities - will be looking at employment and entrepreneurship as part of a broader programme.

Older workers help avoid skills crisis, report finds

Dorothy smith says:

I also agree there needs to be more planning ahead and greater understanding of the work requirements of 40+ population - and I don't mean physical adjustments! Part of the problem may be the number of HR staff under 35 doing the thinking. The focus is on getting talented graduates, not using the existing graduate skills fully. The skills are there, HR isn't looking.

Shares for rights scheme could be forced on unemployed, says HR Legal Service

Tom Toher says:

Weren't retail workers told that they could not be made work on Sundays? I admire your faith in the government of the day but, with Adam Beeston as one of their advisors, why would you not think that this is just a slippery slope just starting?

Pay the main motivator for employees, says Volkswagen HR director

Jeremy Lewis says:

Pay might atract, but it will not retain employees, not on its own, not even as the "main motivator" as claimed. Sure, it might be relatively more important in tough times as people seek higher levels of financial security through their work, but in the long run other motivators are relatively more important. For shopfloor workers it has always been one of the main motivators, along with the social aspects of working with people you like, but for managers and professionals it's recognition, autonomy and self-fulfillment that will ALAWYS win out in the long run. Without offering these you will More...

Skills shortages as young people shun manufacturing

Stephen Melia says:

The Manufacturing Institute runs a schools programme called Make It in Manufacturing. The campaign was established to overturn negative perceptions that some young people hold about careers in the sector and create a pipeline of talent for employers. In the last six years we have engaged with over 60,000 young people and evaluation data shows that a teenager is twice as likely to consider working in the sector after taking part in one of our events. We need more support! Please get involved at www.makeit.org.uk

Shares for rights scheme could be forced on unemployed, says HR Legal Service

Joe O'Donnell says:

The Government has specifically said that unemployed people cannot be forced to take such jobs. They may feel compelled to take them by their financial situation. This is slightly different however.

Nearly 5m workers earn below living wage, says study

Keith Appleyard says:

Looking back, the National Minimum Wage came into force in 1999. With all the publicity beforehand, I had a couple of years notice in which to bump up my employees wages such that I wasn't caught out by it. Over the following decade, I managed to get my entry-level wages up to 25% more than the NMW. I then became aware of the Living Wage, and found that I was paying 5% more than that, so I was the first Nursery in the UK to register for the Living Wage. If you take the long view, I think you can More...

Pay the main motivator for employees, says Volkswagen HR director

James Ryan says:

She misses the mark. Get the pay right first, then the other factors come into play. Offer 10% more, yet horrible bosses and environment and see how that turns out.

Pay the main motivator for employees, says Volkswagen HR director

Peter Copping says:

Unless your are desperate you don't move for less. So pulling people into your talent pipe requires a premium for moving. Not new news I think. Locking people in requires that the cost of leaving is higher than the expectations of future rewards. Of course starting salary is known. The cost of going is more of a risk calculation. The chat down the pub is not about how much you earn but how well have you done and how greasy is the pole?

A guide to employee shareholder contracts

Joe Davies says:

Sounds like more (or should that be yet more?) ideologically driven clap trap designed to drive down wages and strip conditions from hard working employees. Honestly, the best way to make money out of an employee is to keep him or her happy. Whatever you give them, they will give you back tenfold. I would advise against buying shares in any company that adopts this scheme, because the chances are that they are crap employers, therefore crap managers and their shares won't be worth very much for very long. Caveat employee!

TGI Friday's MD: my people management secrets

John Ludike says:

Not much new in this approach and largely copied from Yum and their CEO David Novak of " Taking People with you fame" . Not well known in UK but behind KFC and Pizza Hut Brands .

Employers must adapt global mobility strategies as millennials shun emerging markets, study warns

John Ludike says:

Their is absolutely no shortage of local talent in 23 countries in Africa, Middle East and Asia we operate in as HR largely decentralized to in country HR Execs who use local incentivised employee referral schemes and many a millenial who studied in USA, Europe etc only to happy to be repatriated back to home country. In these markets however its all about the " collective community" hence leverage of these vast family networks.

Osborne's shares for rights scheme could help SMEs attract top talent

Professional Paperweight says:

...you forego your rights for shares and then are sacked for something that could be considered unfair dismissal if you still had rights. Do you get to keep the shares? Would it not make for an uncomfortable AGM? Surely if a person is suitably aggrieved they may seek to cause trouble for the company.

Osborne's shares for rights scheme could help SMEs attract top talent

GRH says:

how this is going to make any difference. It seems to me to be just a back-door means of taking way peoples rights; especially so when you realise that new employees may have to sign up for this scheme as a matter of course. And what use will these shares be? Can you buy more and own the company? What rights will you have. More likely they will be non-negotiable like the tokens used to pay people before the Truck Act. In short it stinks. But then it is designed by a rich person with no doubt shares in companies More...

In this issue: October 2014
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One giant leap: Business, government and education must step up to avoid a skills crisis

 

Icing on the cake: Gregg's talent recipe

 

Behind the story: Rebuilding trust at News UK

 

Beyond appraisals: Fixing performance management

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