Latest comments

NHS pay increase 'unnecessary' and 'unaffordable', says NHS Employers

MLett says:

Not all NHS staff are qualified Nurses, Managers and Consultants. There are many Nursing Assistants, Admin staff, Domestic Staff who earn nothing like the lower of those amounts. A pay freeze means we are effectively taking a cut in pay due to inflation increases. The set increase worked okay for the lower grades in the previous 3 years. This is the first year in 4 years we received an annual increase award of 1%. The compounded effect of further freezes is not good for staff who live to their means. I know NHS staff currently still receive incremental rises but More...

Employment tribunal fees: high price to pay for justice?

Joe Davies says:

This issue is being watched very closely in jurisdictions other than the UK. Here in New Zealand, we face a filing fee in the Employment Relations Authority of $NZ71.50 (37.31 GBP). However, with a government which seems hell-bent on tilting the employment playing field in favour of employers, it would surprise few if our government tried the same thing here. It would be an extremely effective means of taking from employees one of the very few - and anyway largely impotent - levers of justice available to them.

'Exploited' interns not receiving minimum wage, study finds

Ruth says:

My niece has recently started to intern for a fashion magazine in Central London. Not only does she not get paid paid but they send her out with the returns ( items to go back to fashion houses after photo shoots) and she has to cover the travel cost (which is often by taxi due to the bulkiness) out of her own pocket.

Labour pledges 25 hours of free childcare a week

Avi Marranazo says:

If Labour says "free" I reach for my wallet.

Full face veils for NHS staff under review

Tim Douglas says:

I have never read a report of patients complaining about medical staff wearing a veil. Why is this issue being raised now? To add to Tory propaganda scapegoating certain minority groups to deflect attention from their failings as a government.

Employers are ignoring huge pool of female talent, says Amey HRD

Bev Frean says:

Some corporates need to change their practices as much as their culture. I believe the former precedes the hearts and minds, and the decision to embrace these policy and practice changes, from my experience, must come from the very top of the organisation to succeed.

Employers are ignoring huge pool of female talent, says Amey HRD

Bev Frean says:

Some corporates need to change their practices as much as their culture. I believe the former precedes the hearts and minds, and the decision to embrace these policy and practice changes, from my experience, must come from the very top of the organisation to succeed.

Interview with Michelle Luxford, HR director at Travelodge

jill dawson says:

i worked in a travelodge, the manager was not interested in staff, an assistant manager was rude bullying and discriminating with no idea how to lead a team never mind a happy one, any complaints made and you are pushed out. Awful company

Largest leadership programme aims to transform NHS culture

Brian O'Neill says:

Very telling point from David Wylie. 1. A programme for distributing/sharing leadership may be more effective, though more difficult to deliver. 2. Evidence suggests that a top leadership programme by itself won't change culture. An organisation is a system with many key elements: you need to tackle a number of these not just one and the initiatives need to be integrated. Colin Marshall led such a programme in BA of mid 1980s; it was very good and he was a great leader.

Are students really being robbed of the right skills to succeed at work?

Kelly says:

Having worked with young people for the past 6 years and supporting them into work, one of the biggest impacts is the loss of mandatory work experience and a lack of careers guidance and support from the likes of Connexions. Working also with Employers the one key thing they are keen to see from a school leaver is not grades, but what work experience did they do, have they had a part time job, or have they completed any volunteer work or extra curricular activities and qualifications (i.e Duke of Edinburgh), which help to show some skills and a willingness More...

Are students really being robbed of the right skills to succeed at work?

Adrian Oldfield says:

Yes, young people are being robbed of the skills to succeed at work and employers are looking elsewhere to fill the gap and quite right too! The biggest single contributor to the employability of our young people is work experience. Unfortunately it’s no longer mandatory. Removing mandatory work experience is the biggest single example of “skills vandalism” ever! We need to re-instate mandatory work experience at year 10. I'm not talking about two weeks in any old placement; we need to ensure that work experience is relevant to the aspirations of the young person, their predicted exam outcomes and routes More...

Are students really being robbed of the right skills to succeed at work?

Janice Knight says:

I absolutely agree with comments made by Kevin Young. For the past two years I have been working with young people running employability skills courses. The young people I work with are really not prepared for work when they leave school or come out of further education. I also agree that employers need to do more to help young people - perhaps by working more closely with schools and other education providers. I found a local company who were prepared to meet with my students and talk them through an induction process that all new employees receive when they join More...

A fifth of workers fear they will never retire

MLett says:

Retirement ages keep increasing putting any plans people have made out to pasture. It should be a right to retire not a luxury. We all pay our National Insurance contributions.

A fifth of workers fear they will never retire

bj says:

If governments did their job, which includes regulating business, we would not be in the mess we are in. People such as me (small business proprietor) would not see their retirement plans wiped out due to unregulated greed! I'm 75, work a full six day week and probably will until I die. Thanks Thatcher, Major, Blair & Brown - you along with the bankers - ensured that you would be protected from the chaos you caused.

A fifth of workers fear they will never retire

MLett says:

I think the one figure for the state pension is an excellent idea for everyone to be able to have basic money. Because people are not saving sufficiently, I think the auto enrolement should be compulsory and not something people can opt out of. This would ensure people are saving towards retirement. This may not be a popular decision at first but later on I think people will be happy about it.

Prof Michael West: Radical transformation needed in the NHS to improve performance

Bernard Morris says:

Michael you are very close, very close indeed. As someone who started work in the NHS in 1968 when they were phasing out matrons and have witnessed and discussed so many changes since. I believe the problem is and always will be decision making . Most dedicated HHS professionals have all the answers to a great and economic service and can certainly point to what works and what does not work. But the problem is they are not engaged effectively in the decision making process. Simply asking them what they think and then mixing their contribution up with committee based More...

Half of British women admit it's impossible to 'have it all', O2 study finds

Luis A. Marrero says:

Rather than a comment, more of a question and a challenge: if women are prevented from being authentic people and professionals, is this something the HR UK community taking on beyond publishing the article to right a wrong?

HR's Most Influential to be unveiled tonight

HR editorial says:

We have had a few enquiries about how the ranking is put together so a bit of info into our methodology: The ranking is decided by a rigorous process starting out with a long list of hundreds of names made up of people nominated by HR magazine readers, those who have appeared on the ranking in the past and names put forward by the HR editorial team. These are then checked by an expert panel of HR director headhunters, former HRDs and leading academics. From this a shortlist is created, and the top names are put forward to our readers. More...

HR's Most Influential to be unveiled tonight

rich edwards says:

I think we need to give the guys at HR Magazine credit for working hard over a number of years to put together a list which takes the views of the HR community in the way it is put together - it is far better than the many arbitrary lists I see out there in the media. Everyone who is interested can vote and (from memory) the final lists over the past years does tend to represent practitioners and thinkers who are 'of the moment'. Lastly, I'd say HR Magazine's approach to following back on twitter has very little to More...

Royal Mail privatisation plans will lead to 'disengaged' workforce, says Labour MP

john backhouse says:

The sub headline about the privatisation causing workers to have concerns over job security...welcome to the real world, good to have you back after so long in the dark.

In this issue: October 2014
fragment image

Grow influence: Who has made the HR Most Influential 2014 lists? We reveal all inside

Looking good: Beautiful HR at Estee Lauder

Back to the drawing board: Is HR more art than science?

Forward thinking: Futureproof your technology strategy

 

 

MA Business & Leisure Limited © Copyright 2014, All Rights Reserved