Latest comments

Firms have 'fear factor' when employing disabled graduates, says CEO

Steve says:

How do you convince the employer to hire disabled people. Even if the person has all the right attributes there will still be an element of doubt by the perspective employer because they will see the disability first before the ability. I have personally given up all hope because of this I have even offered to work for free just to show them that I am reliable and above all have the right skills for the role, all to no avail. I do not have a day or two off work because of man flu but what I wAnt the More...

NHS pay increase 'unnecessary' and 'unaffordable', says NHS Employers

dave lampert says:

"unnecessary and unaffordable"?-Dean Royles makes alot more money than the average nurse and with: -last 3 years pay freeze -prospect of no pay increase -prospect of a poor 1% pay raise -Community staff will have to pay tax on their travel expenses(and alot of us alrady have) - un negotiated decrease in benefits with the development of corporate Foundation Trusts ie decreased pay protection and carers leave taken away in most FTs -sickness benefits changes -increase in costy of living -increase in petrolnationally-community -cuts in workforce does he really think he or anyone in the scope of power he has More...

National Autistic Society launches campaign to give people with Asperger's Syndrome equal rights at work

John Airey says:

I was dismissed from Cancer Research UK (CRUK) on the grounds that I "would not fit in" - this is exactly the difficulty that those with Asperger's have because of their lack of social skills. So it seems that if you have Asperger's CRUK will be showing you the door. Read more at http://facebook.com/nodismissalfordisability

Automatic bonuses now the norm for UK businesses

Graham Wilson says:

Nearly automatic bonuses became a norm during the last recession in the 90s. It was deemed to be politically incorrect to give salary rises and besides most firms didn't wish to commit themselves to a significantly increased pay bill for the following year, when things might not have got any better, hence a one-off 'bonus'. For most HR/Personnel professionals memories of the 80s recession were still fresh and the thought that this one might be as bad were frightening. So most of us agreed discretionary pots with line managers for them to distribute among their staff. This gave them a More...

BBC pay-off row: Adams under fire for offering outgoing top brass “sweeteners”

donald mccdonald says:

Lucy Adams whole performance over this affair can only be described as an absolute shambles- how on earth did she ever get to be BBC HR Director ??

The HR profession: Our own worst enemies

samarjit says:

Dear Author, What you have brought out in your writing are all true . HR professionals because of lack of business understanding take shelter in more functional roles rather than doing business through HRM . I have practiced HR for nearly 27 years and always found it to be more challenging than before . It is the HR involvement every where, Which ask for more knowledge about the business you are doing than any body else because HR has to place right person , at right place and at right time to achieve the business objectives . So any amount More...

The HR profession: Our own worst enemies

samarjit says:

Dear Author, What you have brought out in your writing are all true . HR professionals because of lack of business understanding take shelter in more functional roles rather than doing business through HRM . I have practiced HR for nearly 27 years and always found it to be more challenging than before . It is the HR involvement every where, Which ask for more knowledge about the business you are doing than any body else because HR has to place right person , at right place and at right time to achieve the business objectives . So any amount More...

Automatic bonuses now the norm for UK businesses

Geraldine Gallacher says:

Should we not distinguish more clearly between bonuses and incentives? The first is retrospective and the first is conditional. I remain to be convinced of the benefits of using incentives to change behaviour that fall outside basic routine tasks. Check out Daniel Pink's Ted Talk on The Science of Motivation.

Bonus caps legal action sends out wrong message

Fredrick Mason says:

"Treasury’s assertion that fixed salaries won’t escalate is hard to argue against." Isn't "Treasury" arguing the opposite? ie it is saying that fixed salaries will escalate?

The HR profession: Our own worst enemies

Theresa Marks says:

In essence there is a lot of HR babble that goes over many people’s heads. I agree with ‘your common sense and problem-solving skills, making a sound and simple business case with anticipated bottom-line measurements in advance of embarking on new approaches. HR- one size doesn’t fit all. It has to be adaptable and flexible and has to meet the business needs. A good HR practitioner has key communication skills, understands the business and is able to see the commercial picture. Knows the law and is able to apply it accordingly.

GE HR director: HR must 'embed' L&D into business culture

Chris Roebuck says:

The fact that a senior director said this in 2013 is actually very frightening. It shows how even in "good" organisations senior leaders are ignorant of much of what HR can do to drive organisational performance.Its staggering that neither HR nor senior line mangers have got this fact despite all the evidence accumulated over the past 50 years ! I just wonder if its HRs fault for not making a clear case or CEOs for not listening or asking. In 1999 I was on an expert panel reporting to Government on how to develop leadership in British Business for competitive More...

Maternity leave discrimination

steve says:

As a father of a 14yr old disabled child and a 20 month old, I currently can take up to 8 weeks per year as unpaid parental leave (4 weeks per child max per year and max total of 36 weeks). But you say females risk redundancy or are overlooked for promotion? As I work in a predominantly male enviroment where no-one takes parental leave, I'd be a fool to take parenal leave.

The HR profession: Our own worst enemies

Tara Daynes says:

I firmly believe that HR has a lot to offer organisations, IF it is implemented effectively by competent people with the right mindset. The problem isn't with the HR function, it's with many of the professionals (& I use that term loosely) in it. I had my own soapbox rant about this a few months ago, with an almost identical heading - http://taradayneshr.wordpress.com/2013/03/24/are-you-hrs-own-worst-enemy/ - seems I'm not alone in my views there!

The HR profession: Our own worst enemies

Steve Chilcott says:

Spot on as ever Helen.

Call for Government to offer 'proper paid' work to unemployed

Steve Skinner says:

The government tells us that over a million new jobs have been created since the coalition came to power. The problem is they don't say what those jobs are. In which industries are they, in which geographical areas are they, how many are minimum wage and how many are real jobs rather than zero hours contracts? If those without a job do not have the experience or even aptitude for the vacancies in their area then no amount of training will make them attractive to a potential employer.

Diversity kicked into touch, leaders admit

Jane Preece says:

If you work in social housing, an article in Inside Housing addressing E&D in the sector is here http://www.insidehousing.co.uk/home/analysis/room-for-improvement/6528565.article

The HR profession: Our own worst enemies

Tim Parry says:

Ms Peacock is spot on The damage done by Adams is terminal. It is function that is trusted by no one and could not run a business let alone itself

The HR profession: Our own worst enemies

Stsn Hornagold says:

Thank you for a thought provoking article and for making me laugh out loud at some of the anecdotes. I think that HR is full of babble, but no more that other functions. Look at finance or marketing for example. I feel that HR lost all arguments about "being at the top table" when it changed from "Personnel" to "HR". Have you yet met a person that wants to be called a "Human Resource"? I haven't! Then why have a department that looks after a group that doesn't exist? If we think of people as though they were money, a More...

Miliband must stop 'demonising' the recruitment industry, says REC

peter ainsley says:

I read EM's speech after coming across this article. I'll be brief but if you are one of the agencies who are in any way threatened by his diatribe then good riddance. If you are one of the agencies who are likely to suffer or be forcibly retired then all the better. If you are one of the agencies who can't do business without operating in an unethical manner then you deserve Miliband's boot to stamp you and your dinosaur breed out. I welcome the kind of industry wide regulations which are likely to kill off the business' which makes More...

Labour pledges 25 hours of free childcare a week

Keith Appleyard says:

Nice idea - I run a not-for-profit Nursery and the Governments' idea of what an hours childcare costs is nearly £1 less than what I have to charge the other 50% of my fee-paying parents to make up for the government shortfall. If I took any more Government-funded places I'd be bankrupt. For 15 hours I get £57 - for 25 hours at break-even I'd need £110 - nearly double!

In this issue: October 2014
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Grow influence: Who has made the HR Most Influential 2014 lists? We reveal all inside

Looking good: Beautiful HR at Estee Lauder

Back to the drawing board: Is HR more art than science?

Forward thinking: Futureproof your technology strategy

 

 

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