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Intern’s death leads to calls for banking culture change

Keith Appleyard says:

When I was working in the Financial Services Industry (for 25 years), for some 10 of that I was on call 24x7. I unilaterally adopted the guidelines of the EU Working Hours Directive and ensured all my staff got an overnight break of 10 hours at their home (ie travelling time is not rest time). I didn't always manage it myself, and we always worked more like 60 hours than 48 hours, but to compensate I ensured I never worked on any transatlantic flight, using that as rest time.

Intern’s death leads to calls for banking culture change

Seshagiri Rao K says:

Profit making and profit oriented business are welcome, but not at the cost of the irreplaceable - people's lives. Let us take a better look at the cost-benefit analysis and our priorities.

Employment in the private sector reaches record high

JB says:

How much of this increase in jobs in the private sector is made up of those with a high level skill or experience who were a victim of redundancy and hence had to move into any kind of job to make ends meat? I know of quite a few people who were in reasonably highly paid jobs and made redundant, who have taken on multiple jobs in supermarkets/bars/call cent res to stay afloat. Some are using it as a stop gap they hope, but some can' t see a way out. I'd like to see the statistics broken down into More...

Intern’s death leads to calls for banking culture change

Sunila Lobo says:

The question, John McIvor, is what actual support did Erhardt get at the bank? Who was his mentor- how many times did they meet- what was exchanged etc. Please do be specific.

Deferring state pension could cost workers £6,000, study finds

GRH says:

are not raiding the pensions pot before you get it they are raiding it after; the whole thing is sick. These people that make these decisions can do so easily because they are very rich and it won't matter a tinkers cuss to them, so long as they are all-right-jack. But it is all part of the Agenda 21 / New World Order scheme to drip feed in these changes so that by the time you reach them they are de-facto and you are either dead or have forgotten what they should have been and so just go along with More...

Intern’s death leads to calls for banking culture change

GRH says:

anyway; we just chase our tails most times making money to buy trinkets and gadgets to say look at me I have made it. In the end, what have we actually achieved? Nothing. we burn ourselves out for a heartless corporation thinking we are 'making it' in life and we measure success by what we have accumulated. But really when we see the hoax it is too late and we die; swept out of the way by the machine to make way for the 'people' following us, so they can do just the same. We will never learn. Oh well, More...

Intern’s death leads to calls for banking culture change

Pip Clarke says:

Many organisational cultures are still to focused on 'face time' versus actual working time. My experience working in investment banking was full of examples of employees 'working' extremely long days but not achieving a comparable output. Employees would take in two jackets for example and leave one on their chair to make it look as if they were still in the office when in fact they had left to go to the gym or a long lunch or even home. Organisations need to focus on output and get away from the obsession with input. If proper performance measures are in More...

Intern’s death leads to calls for banking culture change

Adam says:

It is extremely sad and tragic to see such a young man's life ending in such tragic circumstances. The City of London are a money driven society. Even if one person knew of this intern's Epilepcy - the Bank had Constructive Knowledge of his condition and themselves had a duty to make Reasonable Adjustments for the intern at the work place. Epilepsy is overlooked not only at the work place by employers but by the law makers in the UK. Immediate and strict measures need to be put into place . The offenders must be brought to justice.

Employers must recognise the 'valuable skills' young people offer, says O2 HR director

Cheryl Peto says:

I work for an apprenticeship provider and have seen first hand how engaged employers can help young people. We place suitable apprentices in vacancies across the country and practice what we preach by having a number of apprentices ourselves. We have apprentices who have gone on to be team leaders and managers within the company and remain committed and loyal to their employer.

Is there a business case for flexible working?

Paul Allsopp says:

According to Nick Marks of the New Economics Foundation (Nef) people who are happier at work are more productive – they are more engaged, more creative, have better concentration. He quantitifies "the difference in productivity between happy and unhappy people at work in the range between 10-50% – that is 10% for non-complex repetitive tasks, or up to 40-50% in service and creative industries.” Certainly we must aim to create work environments (and this often is about flexibility) that stimulate people in a way that enables them to work to their potential. Paul Allsopp, The Agile Organisation.

HR challenges of dealing with a five-generational workforce

Sharmiladevi says:

Genz people are very intelligent, brilliant,sensitive,and much shrude.They honour those who a re open with them and who recognize their talents Good article ad still more researches. are needed in this area.

One in four mothers feels discriminated against at work

Srikanth says:

Any employee who is part of a team, will have certain degree of dependency on others. It can get frustrating to work more for the same pay. All the more if one has to update someone every day because they are on partial working hours and their first preference is baby but not business/customers. I salute to such working women who strike a fine balance between family and work. If they are doing so, I see no reason for holding them back. Having said that, it is the responsibility of the young mothers to assure management about their capabilities like More...

Employers should do more to help ex-service personnel into work, study says

Jennifer George says:

I fully agree with the comments in this article that there should be more help provided with the transition into civilian life. This week I am attending the funeral of my brother who struggled and could not cope with civiian life. He developed depression and turned to alcohol. This was a remedy to blot out his thoughts after witnessing horrible things in the Falklands war. It has had a devasting effect on all his family during his suffering, no one could help him I trust now , that he has some peace

Isn't it time to move on from the debate about whether HR is strategic enough?

Professional Paperweight says:

'The advantage HR has over other functions, as recently pointed out by my predecessor Siân Harrington, is that it has its finger on the pulse of every company's greatest asset - people.' This should the case, however I find the more "strategic" HR gets the further it's finger gets from the pulse. Pushing HR work to managers means HR no longer knows who anyone is or the best way to deal with their employee issues.

Isn't it time to move on from the debate about whether HR is strategic enough?

Victoria Tomlinson says:

‘Great article! And actually every discipline needs to be strategic – the points made here could all be said about the communications industry which has been talking about ‘PR in the boardroom’ for years, but not got there consistently. Interestingly, this blog by Helen Taylor shows how some companies are sponsoring senior managers to do executive MBAs to help them understand the bigger picture – and by implication become more strategic? http://bit.ly/18uc0g6 The role of HR in Damart already sounds strategic – ensuring HR is involved in all project teams seems an excellent way to do that?’

Employers should do more to help ex-service personnel into work, study says

Gary O_C says:

I have found over the last forty years in the Electronics industry that even with a large amount of encouragement that it is only the younger & lower ranks that will fully integrate into the industrial work force, although I have met some Naval and RAF commissioned officers (Lieutenant-Commanders & Squadron Leaders ) that I would employ on the spot. It seems that the Army once you get above Sargent you get very set in your ways. I don't think I had better comment on the Ranks of W/O class 2 and above!

Employers should do more to help ex-service personnel into work, study says

Gary O_C says:

I have found over the last forty years in the Electronics industry that even with a large amount of encouragement that it is only the younger & lower ranks that will fully integrate into the industrial work force, although I have met some Naval and RAF commissioned officers (Lieutenant-Commanders & Squadron Leaders ) that I would employ on the spot. It seems that the Army once you get above Sargent you get very set in your ways. I don't think I had better comment on the Ranks of W/O class 2 and above!

Giving feedback internationally

Aadi says:

As our world grows into more and more 'global village', the need to iron out the differences in the way we evaluate has become critical. One way to achieve a consistent and bias less feedback is to implement, what I call 'cumulative metrics system'. Simply put - you gather feedback through out the year (not just at the mid or end) in simple rating scale (1 to 10). At the end of the year - you take cumulative ratings giving weight to the most recent ratings. For example, if the candidate got an average of 7 in a 10 rate More...

UK technology skills shortage drives companies overseas to find the top talent

Harry Cather says:

There is no skills shortage in the UK. There are too many firms who just expect an exact fit to appear and are not prepared to spend some effort to solve their problem. If any of them wish to contact me, I will find them suitable people within weeks.

Change of approach needed to tackle youth unemployment, says BCC skills adviser

John Wastnage says:

Peter, you are absolutely right about the 973,000 including many young people in full-time education. This is a measure of those who are seeking work. Chambers of Commerce work with local schools, colleges and universities to facilitate work experience and employer visits. We would strongly encourage all employers to engage with local education providers and recognise the valuable contribution younger workers can make. Unfortunately headteachers are under pressure to deliver academic exam results and so devote too few resources and time to preparing their students for their working lives. I'm always interested to hear examples of schools and employers working More...

In this issue: July 2014
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Easy being green: Veolia UK's Marguerite Ulrich

Making SME apprenticeships simple

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