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Virtual conflicts hampering international teams

Trina Hoefling says:

Virtual conflicts are often the result of flat communication (email) that leads to inevitable understanding, so setting virtual team agreements to verify and confirm understanding should be the norm. Also, regardless of language and cultural barriers, virtual teams need to develop their own shared vocabulary so that they begin to think - and articulate - better together. Formal communication and LOTS of nudged informal, spontaneous communication should be encouraged and expected so international teams can see past their own perspective and begin to also see one another with more empathy and curiosity. I'm updating my 2000 release on Working Virtually, More...

Talking talent with employees – to tell or not to tell?

Christina Juppe says:

By developing an atmosphere and systems that clearly convey: "ENOUGH room for everyone" rather than "LACK of room" when it comes to career progress and the future of their talent.

Why motivation matters

Bobby Hoffman says:

Interesting historical perspective provided, however just about all the cited work is NOT supported by researched-based evidence. The contemporary motivational perspective embraces social-cognitive theory, where learning, performance, and achievement motivations are contingent upon reciprocal interdependence among personal expectations and values, intentional behaviors, and environmental influences. The interdependent phenomena suggest that human behavior is mediated by cognition and determined by a series of bi-directional, differentially weighted influences, rooted in human sociocultural interaction. Individuals use a personal framework, akin to a set of rules that they act upon, to accomplish their motivational goals. If you liked this comment, you will also like More...

Why motivation matters

Christina Juppe says:

The dictionary defines self-motivation as: Initiative to undertake or continue a task or activity without another's prodding or supervision. Once an individual has understood the "why" of what they are doing and fully engaged and aligned the self with it, motivation becomes an inevitable consequence. In other words, level of motivation goes in essence hand in hand with the amount of responsibility each individual is prepared to take for their actions. Managers, employees and the self-employed alike. Train/teach someone to realise that they are and always will be the sole creator of their experiences and loss of motivation will cease More...

What's the evidence for... change management?

Francois Knuchel says:

One of the key aspects of most 'change management' programs is that the change is invariably imposed, and therefore needs to be managed in the first place. Those affected by change are invariably never asked or invited to co-create the change. This leads to 'resistance', and many change management approaches are about managing this resistance. However, what people resist is not change itself, but having an alien system imposed on them. How about, then, inviting all affected in the process of co-creating the change in a self-organized way? Change should emerge organically, not be forced, as has been proposed by More...

Public sector workers struggling to switch off

Josh Mills says:

It's good to see HR Magazine drawing attention to this important issue. It is exactly what our Go Home on Time Day campaign during National Work Life Week is designed to raise awareness of.

Don't forget what it's like to be a candidate

Bob Jarvis says:

As I am currently a candidate myself, I certainly am not seeing companies sell themselves to me as a candidate, quite the contrary, it appears you to have to work that much harder in an interview given the interviewer is a prospective colleague. I have been hit with several "curve ball" questions, way ouside the scope of the role (as per the brief I received) to observe just how I'd answer it. To date, I'd have to say it's easier dealing with in-house recruiters to avoid being shoe-horned into an unsuitable position. I certainly know what it's like to be More...

Don't forget what it's like to be a candidate

Bob Jarvis says:

As I am currently a candidate myself, I certainly am not seeing companies sell themselves to me as a candidate, quite the contrary, it appears you to have to work that much harder in an interview given the interviewer is a prospective colleague. I have been hit with several "curve ball" questions, way ouside the scope of the role (as per the brief I received) to observe just how I'd answer it. To date, I'd have to say it's easier dealing with in-house recruiters to avoid being shoe-horned into an unsuitable position. I certainly know what it's like to be More...

Don't forget what it's like to be a candidate

Berni Albrighton says:

I work in the HR office alongside some incredible individuals whose days are filled with everything HR related- the good, the bad and the down right ugly. Until I came on board they also had to manage recruitment, something they all admit they did not enjoy doing. I see HR and Recruitment as two different skill sets and if something is a chore, as recruitment was to this team, then it is done reluctantly. When that transfers onto people then the experience is not going to be a positive one. For me the answer is to recognise the skills required More...

What's the evidence for... change management?

Sylvia Lee says:

Excellent article. Here in North Ameria change management has become a profession with all the accompanying tools and resources, etc. the result is too much change management. I've seen change management projects that take longer and consume more resources than the change itself. I've seen projects that tie up resources to effect a change that was both obvious and wanted by everyone. I agree that we need to think about change differently and recognise that people often don't fear change but rather BEING changed. That is, having change imposed on them with no discussion, etc. I also like the comment More...

What's the evidence for... change management?

Steve Carter says:

Interesting and yes there is little direct evidence which change management practices work best - but I am not sure there is that much evidence that people are that afraid of change either - some organisations seems to be change junkies flailing around to find the change initiative that works... It seems to be a virility thing for new leaders to tear up what was done before. ) The idea that people are resistant to change per se needs to be challenged - people ARE resistant to endless disruption; badly thought through plans and being asked to sign up to More...

Half of workers confused by pensions lingo

Abel emoghene says:

This is a good topic in that not everyone is aware of this issue. Many wokers are ignorant leaving employment without payment.it's sad,it's worse in my Country Nigeria,where many had died without money to leave on.

Dave Ulrich: Don't blow up HR, appreciate and evolve it

Michael F Andrew says:

David has presented a very good case on the value of HR and that HR should keep evolving. In reality, his ideas are the exception and not the norm. I wish it were the norm. The threadbare argument to keep evolving HR to be "strategic," "Innovative," a "business partner," "to get a seat at the (executive and CEO) table," and to show their "value" has been a consistent topic for too long, arguably more than 30 years. Enough of the theory and talk and just step up be all that you can be. I believe Dr. Ulrich is right, but More...

Dave Ulrich: Don't blow up HR, appreciate and evolve it

Dennis Carey says:

As one co author of 3 articles featured in HBR you reference, I appreciated your thoughtful comments. Our piece entitled People Before Strategy argued for a more strategic role for HR, and I trust you don't take issue with that argument. As business practitioners who are in the market everyday, we see great HR leaders and CEOs who do it well. We also see some in need of change. I simply hope readers don't assume by your title that you are arguing against our thesis. if you are, then I believe your case needs to be made more convincingly.

Dave Ulrich: Don't blow up HR, appreciate and evolve it

Stuart Pritchard says:

Interesting stuff Dave, thank you. The idea that talent resides in individuals has led to the "war for talent", but talent can also be argued to be a way of operating - which means HR has a crucial role in influencing company culture. A much tougher job and not as heroic sounding as leading a war, but far more useful. On that note, does our own use of language in calling human beings "resources" really help us create environments where people can thrive and contribute their best to the organisation? (You can probably guess my answer from tha fact I've More...

Depression-related EAP calls jump by 40%

Becky Frith says:

Hello Peter - not sure which part of the article you are referring to?

UK under-utilising degree-educated migrants

Dr. Jo Ukemenam says:

Our experience is that the situation is worse for black people with higher (PhD) UK degrees. Their unemployment rate is higher and their inability to secure jobs suited to their skills is even worse. Dr. J. Ukemenam Tel: 07956347622

Employees not paid for jury service

Keith Appleyard says:

My employees are only paid approx. £1 an hour more than the Living Wage, so can ill-afford to lose wages whilst performing their civic duty on Jury Service - especially with a mortgage/rent to pay. I've only got 35-40 employees, so I only get someone on Jury Service every couple of years, and topping them up to their normal wage isn't going to break the bank - eg circa £100 for a whole week. For those organisations that don't pay, would a member of the Board of Directors agree to have their Salary stopped whilst they were on Jury Service? More...

Organisations confusing recruitment with talent acquisition

Vinay Johar says:

The point discussed here, is an important one. There is a significant difference between recruitment and talent acquisition. And the technology of parsing the resumes would surely add an advantage to the recruitment process.

Depression-related EAP calls jump by 40%

Peter Copping says:

Don't men get depression?

In this issue: August 2015
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Stand and deliver: Fresh austerity measures are on the way – but can public sector HR seize the strategic opportunity?

Eureka moment: HR at engineering firm AMFW

Going for gold: Maintaining the Olympic legacy

On the money: Providing innovative rewards

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