Latest comments

Byron uses 'speed dating' to meet passive jobseekers

PeopleHR says:

Very inetersting way to recruit new people and who knows it might be the way forward.

Investor interest in culture on the rise

Matthew MacLachlan says:

Those of us who have a professional interest in culture have been saying for a long time that organisations have overlooked culture and its impact for too long. Even those companies that do account for it tend to measure or examine the superficial level. The important area of culture, and the area that has the potential to cause mischief is the invisible area of assumptions about what is normal, right and wrong, subconscious values and attitudes. These areas are very difficult to change and, because they are hidden, cause the most frustration. Measuring quantitatively is hard because you have to More...

How to successfully manage creative people

Keval says:

As it is rightly mentioned, creative professionals have their own style of working. Setting the right expectations in terms of direction is absolutely essential. They should be given a room to come up with extraordinary ideas by not binding them in organizational hierarchy. Their assignments should be decided on the basis of their personality. Ignoring their ideas can sometimes result into lost opportunities. - Via www.synechron.com

How to successfully manage creative people

manali says:

When it comes to invoke the next brilliant idea out of thin tone, against target, with a combination of inspiration, hard slog, experience, insight and confidence, getting the best work out of the creative people on a reliable and efficient basis can be fiddly business. Sometimes saying the hardest thing is the best mentorship you can give, as oppose to letting someone stay in a pothole. Via - www.synechron.com

How to successfully manage creative people

manali says:

When it comes to invoke the next brilliant idea out of thin tone, against target, with a combination of inspiration, hard slog, experience, insight and confidence, getting the best work out of the creative people on a reliable and efficient basis can be fiddly business. Sometimes saying the hardest thing is the best mentorship you can give, as oppose to letting someone stay in a pothole. Via -  www.synechron.com

Making career management a reality: A guide for HR

Michael Moran says:

Great article. Managers need to understand want is important to their employees, what motivates them and what they like doing and are good at (they are related). The opportunity is to sculpt the job accordingly. What you get is a highly engaged,highly productive employee.

Working from home 'transferring cost onto employees'

Pamela La Gioia says:

I think you hit the nail on the head about management thinking teleworking should be considered one employees' benefits. It is just as much, if not more so, a cost-saver to employers as to employees. Management has a duty to make sure that their staff have everything they need to do their job well--and not at their staff expense. If a company adequately equips onsite staff for a job, why would they skimp on their offsite workers????

The trouble with measuring productivity

HR Editor says:

Hi Duncan, We know who you are of course! You happen to have a name doppleganger who works at UKCES, who is quoted in this article.

The trouble with measuring productivity

duncan brown says:

i think HR magazine should pay more attention to quality than productivity. I am not an economist, nor do i work at UKCES. I am head of consulting at IES. Thanks

Controlling agency spend in the NHS

Stewart Buller says:

Paul, you make excellent points about future workforce in the NHS. But your 'big ask' about 'joined up thinking' will be the rock that all hopes are dashed on. each Trust operates independently, sets its plans independently and recruits as if in a vacuum. The Truth is the workforce is flexible, fluid, transient even, free to take their skills and experience from one Trust to another. But the Trusts themselves are not. Their HR systems are not inter-operative. They can't easily transfer HR details between Trusts and employment legislation forces each Trust to go through the entire recruitment process from More...

Making career management a reality: A guide for HR

Bob Hicks says:

Its not just ladders that need to be in place, but bridges, rope swings, express lifts and whole climbing frames!

Forced gender pay gap disclosure raises questions

Jon Ingham says:

I was on the Today programme talking about this this morning. To me it's only the start of what are going to have to be some much deeper changes towards greater transparency - more comments here: http://strategic-hcm.blogspot.co.uk/2015/07/glassdoor-gender-pay-gap.html

Making career management a reality: A guide for HR

Andrew Mayo says:

I would just add to this good advice: design alternate career ladders wherever possible. One sole hierarchical management ladder is not only restrictive in opportunity but often leads to poor management and the loss of key professional or technical skills. A person can have two "managers" - one administrative and one technical, who holds his/her higher grade solely because of their technical "leadership".

Government forges ahead with strike reforms

Steve Skinner says:

Obviously it's only right that a majority must vote to strike so that a minority doesn't impose its will on the majority. Bearing in mind that only a minority voted for the current government, surely it would only be fair to bring in the same rules for general elections?

Companies forced to reveal gender pay gap

Keith Appleyard says:

Hasn’t David Cameron got better things to sort out than the pay gap for women? (I say that as a proud father of 3 women). For the record, I checked my workforce : average hourly pay for men (6% of my workforce) = £8.92; average hourly pay for women : £9.56. There : Mission Accomplished : I can forget about it now.

Virtual conflicts hampering international teams

Keval says:

Working in a virtual environment has now become inevitable in almost all global companies. Before getting on the full-fledged virtual work environment, it is important for virtual team members to establish a rapport with one another by having a personal interaction in initial days. This gives them a chance to understand each other's personality traits and attitude. This can help them avoid conflict at a later stage. - Via www.synechron.com

Five top tips for implementing flexible working

Lavaun says:

I am in total agreement with both comments. Honesty and integrity are also wining factors. It pays if managers and staff work in tandem with each and quoting the phrase "sings from the same Sheet. Lavaun Crowther Director JPCHR CONSULTING

Virtual conflicts hampering international teams

Carolyn Miller says:

This is a great article - im not sure that all companies that operate in the European or even global environment understand enough about how to work effectively with their colleagues in other countries but its an absolute essential skill today. I really like the idea of building cultural awareness/understanding in as a competency as it needs to be more explicitly called out, rather than assumed and then often forgotten about.

CBI warns of 'skills emergency'

michael stevens says:

zero contract hours agency employees.who is able to take an apprentice for 3 years or more.

Investor interest in culture on the rise

Derek Mowbray says:

This is encouraging that investors are exploring the culture of organisations. Everyone reacts, responds and replies in the context of working out what the culture is and how to behave appropriately within it to survive, and more optimistically, to achieve success and happiness. There are many forms of measuring culture depending on the stance that is taken. If the organisation wishes to perform at its peak consistently, then measurements along the lines of psychological wellbeing and performance are appropriate - the cultural triggers that provokes a positive psychological reaction and response, resulting in greater concentration (reply), motivation and intensity of More...

In this issue: July 2015
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Puzzle it out: The UK's productivity conundrum – and what HR can do to solve it

Best thing since sliced bread: HR at Warburtons

Shining stars: Celebrating 20 years of HR Excellence

Learn a thing or two: Areas of interest for L&D

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